I’m writing a thing and it doesn’t have a single spaceship in it.

WHUUUUUT?

SONY DSC

So I started this thing about three weeks ago and it’s queer and contemporary and it’s not even remotely science fiction.

Which was kind of freaking me out at first.

Like, I write sci-fi and horror. That’s what I do. But while I was watching the Olympics I got really excited about figure skating because FIGURE SKATING and anyway I started typing and before I knew it I was writing a contemporary lesbian romance story about these rivals turned lovers figure skaters and what even am I doing with my life? Continue reading

NaNoWriMo² or 50k in 60 Days

Feeling overwhelmed? Relax, bro!

So I’m doing NaNoWriMo this month for the 3rd consecutive year. I talked about this a little in my post last month – What I’ve Learned from NaNoWriMo. As we near the middle of November, I thought I’d share something with fellow WriMos who may be feeling a little overwhelmed, or have already made the conscious choice to move at a slower, more conscious pace than the 50k in 30 days goal.

Now let me back up here by saying I know writers who can EASILY churn out 50k in 30 days with time to spare – while producing GOOD first drafts. But that simply isn’t the case for all of us, and I honestly begin to have reservations about encouraging that kind of breakneck pace writing – especially for new and younger writers just starting out.  Continue reading

What I’ve Learned from NaNoWriMo

Well, it’s almost that time again. In less than a month it will be time for writers worldwide to begin their annual flailing of fingers across keyboards and (for some truly intrepid travelers) a scrabbling of pens across Compound notebooks. At my library, I’m planning several official events during October and weekly write-ins throughout November.

That being said. I’m not really doing NaNo this year. Continue reading

On the Importance of Reading Aloud

Following on this awesome post by Lindsay Allison about the importance of being a good beta reader, I’d like to share something I’ve learned from our little cuddle-fest of local writers.

One of the most important things I’ve learned from my critique group is how important it is to read your own fiction aloud. Before the formation of this group, I never used to read my own writing aloud, but now I do it in my everyday practice. After I’ve finished a chapter or long section of writing, I will go back over it and, rather than simply reading it silently in my head as I would once have done, I read it out loud to myself. Continue reading

A Wild Blogger Appears! 2013 Goals Update! Also New Theme!

2013 Writing Goals Update

Back in January, I did a list of writing goals for the upcoming year. And I gotta say, I haven’t done too horribly. I’ve always been the type of person to set inhumanly lofty goals for myself (insert shooting for moon, landing among not stars because stars are not closer than the moon thank you science clichéd phrasing here) and this was no exception. So, despite not meeting all of my goals, I think I’m doing well so far. Let’s do a quick analysis, shall we? Continue reading

True Love Waits – A blurb for my new novel project

I’m very happy with this blurb, so I wanted to share:

Patsy Godwin is a good Christian woman, but lately God has been testing her. She and Peter were having some marital problems, but that’s all behind them now. So is Peter’s bashed in skull. She should have seen it coming. He was too perfect. Too holy. Outwardly, he was the perfect Baptist preacher, protector of his small rural flock. But even the godliest of men is bound to have a flaw. Peter’s fatal flaw turned out to be fucking Patsy’s daughter in the tool shed one night after the Father/Daughter dance. Now Patsy’s got a taste for blood that can only be quenched with more murder.

Yowsa.

This will certainly be something different from what I’m used to writing.

Social Networking Sites for Writers/Bloggers – My Faves

I recently changed my WordPress theme again (do we like?) mainly because I didn’t like the narrow design of Skeptical and I wanted something more minimal and clean looking, with a better font pack. I’m now using Able, with custom colors. I like the newly opened space on my blog. It looks clean and organized, but it’s also colorful and fun in a way that it wasn’t before. As I was re-organizing my sidebar content for the new theme it occurred to me, “Goodness gracious I have a ton of social networking sites. This seems rather unnecessary.” So I got rid of some of them. Which ones did I deem worth keeping, you ask?

  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Instagram

That’s it. That’s all. Now, here’s my reasoning behind the apps I kept.

Twitter is great for short bursts of information; little shout outs as it were. I also keep a feed of my 5 most recent Tweets in my sidebar because they’re short, completely text-based, and don’t add any unnecessary clutter. If I want to make a quick update about something, but don’t necessarily want to publish a whole blog post about it, I can just throw it up on Twitter. This way, people can still see it directly on my blog even if they don’t use Twitter. At the same time, I’m not spamming all my WP followers’ reader feeds with little updates multiple times a day.

Google+ still hasn’t really caught on in a lot of circles, but I love it and here’s why. Like Twitter and Facebook, you get a news feed. But unlike Twitter, it’s a great medium for sharing articles and media with photos and video. Many Plus users have begun using it as a primary blog, because it’s so visually pleasing and easy to maintain. I also love the Hangouts feature and have used it for on the fly writer’s chats with my critique group. If you’re promoting a new book or want to host an online chat for your fans, Google Hangouts is a great option for something like that. And how much the better if you already have a following there via your Plus page?

Instagram is my go to for photo sharing. With the new “view from the web” feature, there’s no reason to rely on an outdated clunky site like Flickr for image sharing anymore. No offense to Flickr, but I never cared for it very much even  in its heyday, and nowadays it’s more outdated than ever. I love the clean interface of Instagram, and the profile feature that lets you see all of a user’s photos in one easy to view page. The mobile app is great for grabbing pics on the go and sharing them with your friends either through the app, or online.

I had to. I’m not sorry.

You will no doubt notice one giant gaping whole here. I don’t use Facebook. Well, I use Facebook, but I use it only for private correspondence and personal friends. I will certainly create a Facebook account to promote my writing at some point in the future… say… if and when I get published. But until then it seems sort of pretentious and just unnecessary to promote… nothing really? I mean, I don’t have a book yet. I’m not selling anything. I had fan pages in the past for visually creative work I did, and for businesses I ran, but I’m not sure what I would have to contribute to a FB page for my writing. I’ll get back to you on that after I publish my first book. 😉 That being said, if you are a published author, you should absolutely use a Facebook fan page as a promotional tool.

Social networking has grown and changed so much over the last several years, and will obviously continue to do so. Myspace** has gone the way of the dinosaur, and so too will others. I think it’s fascinating to watch and analyze how we share information and how that sharing changes over time. Lol, probably why I’m a librarian. Information technology, yo. It’s good stuff. ;D

** The new and improved Myspace notwithstanding. We’ll see how that goes when it finally debuts sometime next year.